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Central Scotland | amackie@sandler.com
 

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How do you feel talking about money?

In training this week, we asked how our clients feel, when they talk to their prospects about the costs of their products or services. Many of them admitted that they feel very uncomfortable bringing up this subject with their prospects.

It is really common. A lot of us probably remember, how our parents taught us to not to talk about money.

They might have said things like

  • Money doesn’t grow on trees (my father’s favourite)
  • A fool and their money are easily parted
  • It's rude to talk about money
  • Where there is muck there is brass

These childhood messages stick and hold many people and business back from charging correctly and in some cases completely losing the business because they avoid or are inept at talking about money.

So how to get past this fear?

First of all, like most fears they are rooted in deeply held beliefs that were established in childhood and may no longer serve you as an adult. So step one is recognition you have it and that it is quite common and unhelpful.

Secondly, learn some tools to deal with it. If you really struggle, then bring it up early. We had one client that was so frozen talking about money that it nearly cost her, her job. By simply saying very early in the meeting that she was uncomfortable talking about money and asking if it was worth covering it now she took all the pressure out of the meeting. She went on to do very well in her role.

Another thing is to learn some tools for talking about money. Perhaps bracketing, round numbers, ball-park etc. We teach much more.

Something rarely considered is what if the prospect feels uncomfortable talking about money and you don’t. How would that work? Often not well, if handled badly. You could come across as crass, arrogant, insensitive or thoughtless.

And lastly, remember that you are selling a product or a service and the prospect is buying. That always means exchanging money. So it’s perfectly natural.

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